Making and taking information

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Tue, 10/26/2021 - 11:57

Information behavior theory covers different aspects of the totality of information-related human behavior rather unevenly. The transitions or trading zones between different types of information activities have remained perhaps especially under-theorized.

Call for papers for a special issue on Advances in Research on Information Creation at Library and Information Science Research

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Sat, 07/31/2021 - 15:41

Guest Editors

  • Isto Huvila, Department of ALM, Uppsala University (isto.huvila@abm.uu.se)
  • Jennifer Douglas, School of Information, University of British Columbia, (jen.douglas@ubc.ca)
  • Tim Gorichanaz, College of Computing & Informatics, Drexel University (gorichanaz@drexel.edu)
  • Kyungwon Koh, School of Information Sciences, The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (kkoh@illinois.

Why (on earth) this would be an infrastructure - or a boundary object?

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Tue, 11/03/2020 - 14:27

A doctoral student asked me some time ago about one of my studies, why I am framing a method as an infrastructure (publisher's site). A good question, absolutely, and it is not necessarily that obvious. In that particular study the method was of course a method. At the same time, however, as I at least tried to discuss in the text, it was also a sort of a scaffold and infrastructure to produce a certain kind of documentation of an archaeological site.

What categories are significant? Do you choose your information sources because they are (non)-digital?

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Fri, 10/30/2020 - 14:27

0100100101010101000In information studies like in all social research, there is plethora conventional categories that researchers and non-researchers alike have a tendency to consider -- and many more that are typically not addressed.

Information science should be amplifying contradictions, too

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Sun, 05/24/2020 - 01:21

Recently, I happened to stumble upon an interesting piece, written by Amanda Ripley already for a couple of years ago, on how journalists should start making a push to present the complexity of the matters they are reporting -- and stop trying to simplify everything to death. Extreme simplicity that has become the gold standard of how news stories and everything else is reported in the professional and social media alike needs to go away.

On the shifting grounds of archaeological information work

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Fri, 10/11/2019 - 19:28

On shifting grounds – the study of archaeological practices in a changing world conference gathered a good number of peopel on 3-5 October 2019 in Rethymnon, Crete. The conference was organised by COST Action Archaeological Practices and Knowledge Work in the Digital Environment (ARKWORK) in collaboration with the Department of History and Archaeology of the University of Crete, and chaired by Åsa Berggren (Lund University), Antonia Davidovic (University of Heidelberg) and Theodora Moullou (University of Crete). I presented some preliminary theoretical considerations relating to the CAPTURE project in a talk titled "Where to find archaeological information work and how to CAPTURE it".

A session on paradata at CAA 2020 in Oxford

Submitted by Isto Huvila on Sun, 09/15/2019 - 01:49

Good news for everyone interested in paradata! At the forthcoming Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA) 2020 conference in Oxford  held April 14-17, 2020, there will be a dedicated roundtable session on the topic. Detailed instructions for submissions and the official CAA call for papers will be coming out soon but as a sort of a teaser, a brief description of the session can be found below.